Warren Sipe House, Home and Hospital

Inscription reads: "This was the home of Edward T.H. Warren, a Harrisonburg attorney. As a lieutenant in the Valley Guards, a Rockingham County militia company, Warren attended the trial and execution of John Brown in Charles Town (in present-day West Virginia) in 1859. Warren was elected a town councilman in 1860, but soon left for the war. His former militia unit became Co. G in the 10th Virginia Infantry, which he helped form. He was commissioned lieutenant colonel on July 1, 1861, and commanded the regiment after Col. Simeon B. Gibbons was killed at the Battle of McDowell on May 8, 1862."

Warren led the regiment through some fierce battles in which the Army of Northern Virginia engaged in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. They include Port Republic, the Seven Days' Battles around Richmond, the Second Battle of Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Second Battle of Winchester, Gettysburg, and the Wilderness. Warren was seriously wounded during the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863, while commanding a brigade that included the 10th Virginia. He was killed in action a year later on May 5, 1864, at the Wilderness. Warren is buried in Harrisonburg's Woodbine Cemetery on East market Street. George F. Sipe, a prominent attorney and Virginia House of Delegates member, bought Warren's house in 1864.

In July 1863, Confederate soldiers wounded at Gettysburg filled Harrisonburg's general hospital as well as private homes. The Warren family cared for Confederate artillerist Joseph W. Latimer, the "Boy Major," whose arm had been amputated. A Virginia Military Institute cadet who studied artillery tactics under Professor Thomas J. Jackson, Latimer enlisted in 1862 at age 18, was appointed lieutenant in the Courtney Battery, and by April 1863, had been promoted to major. He died here of gangrene on August 1, 1863, aged 19. He is buried at Woodbine Cemetery.